Use Visual Processes for Tracking your Data image

Blog

Use Visual Processes for Tracking your Data

Written by Nathanial Marshall, Practitioner at LI Europe

The world is full of information – more data has been created in the last 5 years than in the entire previous history of human existence. While this may seem like an excess of information, data is essential for the world economy and for business.

For example, GDP (Gross Domestic Product) is the typical yardstick to measure a country’s economic performance. But did you know that this wasn’t used as standard until after the Wall Street Crash of 1929? It was then decided that a country’s output and value would be a good measurement of economic performance and could help prevent future economic catastrophe.

In business, we must collect data so that we can measure performance. However, it is not enough to simply collect the data, we need to ensure it is clearly presented so that our teams understand when they are performing well.

Visual management is an excellent way of communicating information, and some of the best illustrations of this are in sport.

Take cricket for example – Jofra Archer is running in and bowling to the Aussie Batsmen at 90mph, and the ball hits the player on the leg pad.  Archer appeals to the umpire for leg before wicket. The umpire raises a single finger to give the batsman, the crowd and the viewers at home a clear visual signal that the player is out.

And while hand signals are used in cricket, other sports such as football use red and yellow cards as visual cues.

So how can we apply visual management to business? What simple cues can be used to let teams know whether they are meeting KPIs?

I was recently working with a steel manufacturer that wanted to improve their output following a move to a new factory. They knew at the end of the day how many products they had produced, but how useful is that information to them once the day is finished? How would they know where and when the performance was? Was it consistent on an hourly basis, or was it a day with peaks and troughs of productivity?

One of the first things we did was introduce an hourly performance tracker board (short interval control).  We asked the line crew to complete it every hour to visually demonstrate how many products that line had produced in that hour. They were given red and green pens to clearly show if this was at the pre-defined target or not.

Looking at the performance of the factory the following week, output improved by 20%. Nothing else had been changed apart from the introduction of visual boards.

I asked the operator how the line had improved. “I am showing everyone in the factory how we are performing; I want to make sure we perform well and have green on that board every hour,” she told me.

That simple visual tool had automatically improved the level of engagement as well as ownership for the improvement.

As well as the initial uplift in performance, it allowed us to understand the reasons for poor-performing hours and put plans in place to correct and improve. All with the input and engagement of the team who were providing the information in the first place. 

The initial level of engagement continued and unlocked some potential amongst the shop floor employees who wanted to learn focused improvement techniques.  We supported this with a course of FMCG Lean Sigma Yellow Belts. The factory continues to go from strength to strength on its improvement journey, and we are now supporting the completion of FMCG Green Belts.

What this example shows is that improvement can come through small steps. You don’t have to implement huge major changes across the entire organisation in one swoop. The true definition of engagement is people giving discretionary effort to improve performance.

If you’d like to learn more about how LI can help you improve performance, get in touch with one of our expert consultants. You might be surprised at how quickly you can get results with just a few simple changes.

Check out the different ways LI Europe can work with you to improve factory performance

Testimonials

It’s brilliant! We used to produce 3 or 4 full bins of waste a day now we’re down to less than ½ a bin! The final bit of work we do should reduce it to virtually nothing!

Operator – Branded Bakery

We are pleased with the progress we’re making at the Gweedore site, indeed we’re so pleased that we’re planning to roll out the programme to our other manufacturing sites.

John Donnelly, General Manager, Largo Foods, Ireland