Written by Jason Gledhill, Engagement Leader at LI Europe.

As a Manufacturing Improvement Professional, I am lucky to have the opportunity to visit many factories, producing huge numbers of different products. Many of these factories have been good, but on occasion, some of these factories have been exceptional. The layout of the production facilities, level of GMP and the standard of visual management within these factories have been outstanding.

It’s from these factories that I have become a thief.  Perhaps thief may be a strong word to use but why not share great ideas around when you have the chance.   I have not been too proud to learn new ideas and have subsequently implemented them in many manufacturing facilities. Even mediocre sites often do some things better than anyone else.

I am fortunate to be able to visit a range of factories on a regular basis, whereas many of you will be on the same site day in and day out and have little, or no opportunity to visit other sites. Imagine if you had the chance to visit numerous production facilities and see different ideas and ways of working?

Members of The Ambassadors Academy (TAA), on occasion, willingly host onsite visits to their fellow Academy members. This enables members to learn and take ideas, in return of course they also get fantastic independent feedback on what they themselves can still improve.

Every month a group of Improvement Specialists from various factories meet to discuss their latest projects and the implementation issues they are facing. Ongoing training in tools and techniques, that TAA members have requested, is delivered by LI Europe.

Click here for more information about The Ambassadors Academy.

Written by James Hayward, Practitioner at LI Europe.

marmite-puzzleTesco and Unilever had a disagreement not so long ago which led, when Tesco refused to accept a price increase, to Marmite being unavailable on Tesco’s website and a Marmite drought on Tesco supermarket shelves.  The Tesco-Unilever dispute was quickly resolved, but it was a sign of things to come and, love it or hate it, a few weeks later Marmite was making headlines again.  This time it was due to Morrisons raising their Marmite price by 12.5%.  But that wasn’t the end.  Later on the same day, Typhoo announced that they were in discussions with supermarkets about price rises.  This is a pattern that is set to continue.

We had been warned that this would happen.  The British Retail Consortium told us that the impact of the falling pound would eventually result in higher prices.  The International Trade Minister, Mark Garnier, has said that this is a ‘well predicted effect’.  Of course, it’s all to do with Brexit and isn’t going to end any time soon.

So the falling pound is bad news for Marmite lovers and tea drinkers, but what does it mean to food manufacturing businesses?  Is it a threat or is it an opportunity?  If prices of raw materials go up, then how will inefficient factories, with high levels of waste, fare against more efficient factories with low levels of waste?  If all else stays the same, any gap in the financial performance of the two factories will grow.  As time goes on, pressure will rise and things could get….difficult.  Now, more than ever, factory managers need to boost their improvement programs.

If you’re concerned about how you’re factory is performing in the post-referendum Britain, then please get in touch for a free no-obligation discussion.

Written by Jason Gledhill, Head of Reliable Maintenance at LI Europe

Plan-Effective-Meetings

[Source: quotesgram.com]

Those people fortunate enough to be a child in the 80’s will undoubtedly recognise the opening narration of the hugely popular A Team…

“In 1972, a crack commando unit was sent to prison by a military court for a crime they didn’t commit. These men promptly escaped from a maximum security stockade to the Los Angeles underground. Today, still wanted by the government, they survive as soldiers of fortune. If you have a problem, if no one else can help, and if you can find them….maybe you can hire The A-Team.” [Source: IMDB Quotes]

 

Every week the A team were portrayed as acting on the side of the good, helping an oppressed community against a band of thugs and bullies. The programme inevitably ended with an outlandish finale with over-the-top violence (in which people were seldom seriously hurt), spectacular explosions, and jeeps being overturned.

John “Hannibal” Smith would create a complicated plan and rely on BA “I pity the fool!” Baracus, Templeton “Face” Peck and the crazy pilot “Howling Mad” Murdock to deliver its success. The ability of the team to form weaponry and vehicles out of old parts formed a focus for the last 20 minutes of the program.

 

How do you think Hannibal relayed his plan to the rest of the A Team?

  1. Did he keep it in his head and not tell anyone about it?
  2. Did he write it down and give it to everyone as a memo? (No e-mails back in the 80’s)
  3. Did he just tell one of the team and expect them to relay the plan between each other?
  4. Did he have a meeting with the rest of the A Team and the people who hired them?

Undoubtedly he chose option 4; and judging by the results, where the underdogs – the A Team – overcame overwhelming odds and beat the bad guys every week, without injury to themselves or the people who hired them, Hannibal’s meeting must have been highly effective.

 

Just take a second and ask yourself “How effective are my meetings?”

  • Do you always get the results you desired?
  • Does everyone involved in the meeting see them as value adding?
  • Do people turn up prepared?
  • Do all the actions get recorded and delivered?

 

If you’ve answered no to any of the above, your meetings aren’t as effective as they could be. 
So here are a few simple tips for effective meetings:

  • Have your meeting standing up
  • Lock the door after the start of your meeting
  • Keep score of the issues raised, actions assigned, actions completed on time and reviewed
  • Track how many actions have a who, when and what

And remember:

  • To value the input of each delegate
  • Make sure only one person speaks at a time
  • Never belittle anyone else’s ideas
  • 70% agreement = 100% commitment for decisions

 

If you would like to utter Hannibal’s immortal words “I love it when a plan comes together” then get in touch for your FREE ‘Effective Meetings Tip Card’ – call 0333 456 1988 or drop us a line to place your order contact@li-europe.com. 

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This blog is the fifth in a series written by Jeremy Praud, Head of UK & Europe. (To start at the beginning, click here.)

Lean-and-Green-webinar-Video15 years ago, LI developed an approach to making Lean work in FMCG.  It was entirely results focussed – the founders had and unstinting belief that if you followed the process, you would achieve rapid and sustained improvement. 

Those of you who have come across driver tree based problem solving will know what a wonderfully logical and concise approach it is.  That’s why 15 years ago, we applied our own problem solving method to the factors that drive sustainable improvement in a factory.   The result was the SIM – the Sustainable Improvement Model.

We’ve been putting this to use in the intervening period, and as with all good driver trees, as we get new knowledge and understanding, we can refine it time and again, to evolving it to ensure nothing is missed, and the relative importance of each of the elements is understood.  After a few years, and having tested it across many different sectors, we realised that as much as the structure was common across all sectors, each sector needed its own refinement.

In particular, we noticed that the asset value against operating cost has a significant impact on the rapidity and value that certain improvement techniques bring – thus to truly ensure we could get as close to the maximum rate of improvement possible, we needed a bespoke approach for FMCG v high asset intensity sectors.

A decade down the line, with instances where clients have used the SIM to drive their improvement and in so doing have won multiple awards, the precise understanding of ‘what to do, when’ to ensure rapid and sustained manufacturing profit improvement is better understood than ever.

Since every factory is starting from a different place, the one size fits all approach just isn’t going to deliver the maximum rate of improvement for a given site.   The SIM rates each element across a 5 point scale:

  1. Not Engaged
  2. Experimenting
  3. Effective
  4. Good Practice
  5. Best Practice.

An early learning was that it is vastly more important to identify the elements that have no or little focus, and are rated as Not Engaged or Experimenting, and turn them Effective.  Where there is a lot to do, there is clear path that can be mapped out as what to prioritise in year 1, and what can wait until year 2 or 3.  The rate of improvement of a site that has merely achieved “Effective” at every level of the SIM is impressive – and this doesn’t take anything more than doing the basics well.

The M&S Plan A audit framework has become the first retailer supplier audit to review against a Lean Framework.  The first version of this framework, developed in association with the people who coined the term Lean from an academic analysis (the reasons behind Toyota’s success) is true to Classic Lean, and has yet to be tailored for FMCG.

The purpose of a Lean Audit is simple – to drive improved value, and ultimately reduced manufacturing cost.  The Manufacturers who remember this when following a retailer Lean Framework will do best and maximise the value from lean auditing.

For more discussion on making Lean work in FMCG – register for  Food Manufacture’s Lean Audit webinar (11am, Tuesday 26th April).

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Written by Steve Roger, Global Managing Director of LI Europe

iStock_000010821364_LargeErica recently shared a great blog on how manufacturing professionals can find ‘hidden zones‘ by exploring their strengths and weaknesses. This week, I’d like to examine this subject in some further detail…

A key requirement to enabling the delivery of manufacturing improvement is to measure where we are. The common statement made is “what you don’t measure, you can’t improve”.

This is often a key aspect in audits or using KPIs to measure and drive performance.

Following these audits, the focus is often on improving the “weak” areas: a valid and essential approach if the “weak” area is not at the certain, required level. However, to continue to focus on weak areas to match performance in other stronger areas may in fact be a mistake.

In studies (Corp Leadership Council) of 20,000 people across multiple organisations, the results revealed that when people focused on their strengths, performance increased by 36% – whereas when they focused on a weakness, performance dropped by 27% (CLC 2002).

All manufacturing organisations have individuals with diverse talents and strengths. Leveraging and building on the strengths of the individuals within a team actually minimises the impact of the “weaknesses” in other members, and typically fosters both greater engagement and greater commitment.

Often the barrier to Continuous Improvement is individuals resisting changing their behaviours. Encouraging individuals to focus on what they do well, and can do more of, results in positive outcomes and increased motivation -which often makes individuals more receptive to adopting new behaviours.

Ultimately, being open about and understanding the strengths of different team members helps a team to better leverage their collective strengths. If you’d like help with identifying, measuring, and managing your  team’s strengths – get in touch and start improving your manufacturing performance today.

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Written by Erica Bassford, Head of Aspire at LI Europe

Four eggs 2During a recent management training course I was asked if an individual should focus on improving their weaknesses first or developing their strengths. It’s a bit like ‘which comes first, the chicken or the egg?’

You are only as strong as your weakest link. If your weakness is something you need to use in your day to day life, being your weakest link is probably having a significant effect on your overall effectiveness. Our strengths, on the other hand, form part of our Unique Selling Point (USP). Continually developing our USP to ensure it remains unique is important, isn’t it?

We all prefer to work on what we enjoy and what we enjoy is almost always something we find relatively easy or we are good at it. Investing in your weakness, therefore, is likely to be more time consuming, more frustrating and will require more effort.

There is no straight answer but what is clear, our first task is to understand ourselves not only from our perspective, but from the perspective of others. We all have ‘hidden’ zones, things people see in us that we are blissfully unaware of. For example, jangling change in your pocket, or saying ‘Umm’ repeatedly during presentations. Once we truly understand our strengths and weaknesses we can make an informed decision on what to invest our time and effort in, and can look for alternatives to help. One of the best ways to overcome our weaknesses is to work with someone who has that as their strength, learning from them. An alternative may be to delegate or even outsource a task that require us to use our weakness.

In truth we will need to develop both our strengths and weaknesses but for the most efficient outcome we not only have to fully understand ourselves, but also the strengths and weaknesses of those around us. Need help with your chicken and egg? We can help you build your unique development plan then work with you to excel.

For more on our Aspire coaching and mentoring programmes for Front Line Managers, get in touch.

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